Tag Archives: racism

Black = White 

I recently had the pleasure of joining The Hate Busters in NYC, a new initiative designed to counter negativity and media misrepresentation, by spreading the loving message of Islam, directly from the sources.

Hate Buster truck #2 carried the statement of the Prophet Muhammad, where he said:

“A White has no superiority over a Black, nor does a Black have any superiority over a White, except by piety and good deeds.”

On Broadway in midtown Manhattan, the response on the street was amazing, with many stopping by and expressing their happiness and agreement with both the message and our mission.

It was great engaging with so many people, seeing their bright smiles and hearing their touching and powerful words of support. One woman asked if she could hug me. Her tight embrace wordlessly conveyed solidarity and gratitude.

The most beautiful part of the day for me though, was when we took a break and went to the mosque a few blocks away, for the afternoon prayer.

I joined other women who were there to pray as well. We stood jointly – foot to foot, shoulder to shoulder, and we performed the prayer as one unit – as sisters. Within our prayer was the manifestation of the statement of the Prophet Muhammad we had been sharing with the public. The very fruit of the teachings of Islam.

I saw the beauty of the varying hues of our hands, side by side on the carpet as we lowered our heads down to the floor before our Maker, the One who is truly superior to all; Who created us as equals, and made us vary so that we may know one another.  The richness of our diversity only enhanced our connection to one another and increased our devotion to the One, who through His supreme knowledge and wisdom gave us our unique characteristics.

After we completed the prayer, we greeted each other with wide smiles and loving handshakes. This is a gift to us from our Creator, to be able to see the beauty and goodness in each other. To feel genuine love for people we’ve never met. Women, whose hearts, like mine, desire the pleasure of our Lord, and soften with gratitude, humility and love of Him.

Islam broadened my horizons and enriched my life in so many ways. The pleasure of being part of such a diverse group is something I had never experienced prior to my Islam. I consider this expansion to be one of the many blessings I have since received.

It’s amazing that 1400 years ago, the cure for racism was implemented amongst the Muslims and that it can be eradicated from anyone who truly loves God and chooses to submit themselves to Him today, by the same means.

I hope the fact that these words were uttered by the prophet Muhammad makes many people think about him and see what a loving, equitable human being he truly was and the value Islam has brought to humanity.

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Is That an Arab?

Last night, while walking from my car to a shopping center, I passed by a vehicle with its windows open.

I heard someone say loudly,

“What’s that? Is that an ARAB?”

Who… me?

Sorry, “Muslim” and “Arab” are not synonymous.

Actually Muslims are found all over the world. From China, Russia, and Indonesia to many parts of Africa and Europe, to both North and South America.

Muhammad, the prophet who was given the Quran was a descendent of the prophet Ishmael who was the son of Abraham – he was an Arab.

Jesus and many of the prophets we know of, were from what we now call the Middle East as well… And nobody seems to think all Christians are Semitic or Middle Eastern… Go figure!

The Quran makes it very clear that it is a message for mankind:

This (Quran) is but a reminder for all people. (38:87)

Muhammad is addressed in the Quran: And We (God) have not sent you except comprehensively to mankind as a bringer of good tidings and a warner. But most of the people do not know. (Quran 34:28)

That’s why people from all over have accepted it as their life’s guidance.

I learned about Islam independent of any people. I didn’t know any Muslims.

For me, it was clearly a universal message.

It not only speaks to individuals regardless of their background but it is also timeless. I didn’t get the feeling that it was irrelevant or outdated.

Aspects of the quran describe our modern world and it provides comforting advice that is perfectly on point.

So for me and many other Americans like me, it was a natural choice.

And when we chose to be Muslims, we didn’t change our ethnicity, or race, or nationality, or culture. Just like the first Indonesians who embraced Islam, or the first Bosnians.

In America, the Muslims are the most diverse faith group. When I go to a mosque I sit amongst people of many shades and diverse backgrounds.

Islam, in practice, eliminates racism and nationalism. It teaches us to focus on our humanity and to rejoice in our differences.

To get to know one another.

So one doesn’t need to be Arab to be Muslim, and no one should assume that every Muslim they see is an immigrant either!

I’ll leave you with the following verse:

O humankind! Surely We have created you from a single (pair of) male and female, and made you into nations and families so that you may know one another (and so build mutuality and co-operative relationships, not so that you may take pride in your differences of race or social rank, and breed enmities). Surely the noblest, most honorable of you in God’s sight is the one best in piety, righteousness, and reverence for God. Surely God is All-Knowing, All-Aware. (Quran 49:13)

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